Marginal Column

Photo | Ortic AB

The bicycle races at the 2004 Olympics in Athens were staged in this velodrome.
Photo: Ortic AB

Photo | Ortic AB

The “Le Tarmac” events arena in Déols, France.
Photo: Ortic AB

Photo | Ortic AB

Twenty-four rolls shape the components, up to 150 meters long, along four axes.
Photo: Ortic AB

Ortic on the roof

The roof of a modern sports stadium comprises thousands of custom-made metal parts. Ortic’s latest 3-D roll former fits compactly in a container and that simplifies work for any firm specializing in architectural profiles. A crane can hoist the machine to the roof and the parts are shaped right where they are needed.

At the same time, this further development of the 3-D roll former for architectural applications offers another highlight. Those shaped parts, up to 150 meters in length, can also be given a slight bend, right in the machine. In the past a separate unit was needed. “Having to machine the material just once is a tremendous advantage,” confirms Mattias Nord, production manager at Ortic. Rexroth was involved in the entire development process and supports Ortic with its global logistics network.

A large share of the automation and drive components also comes from Rexroth. Motors in the IndraDrive Mi series, with their integrated servo drives, execute all the movements. This means that power and control signals flow through just one cable, fitted with quick-release connectors secured with padlocks. “Since all the servo drives are connected in series, the heat level in the switchgear cabinet is significantly lower than for the predecessor model of the 3-D roll former,” explains Mattias Nord. “That has also let us reduce wiring by seventy percent – a major factor for a mobile machine

Motion is effected rapidly and precisely via a ball screw assembly with an electromechanical actuator and profiled rail systems. Twenty-four rolls form and bend the components along four axes: the X axis while the material is being fed, the Y and B axes for lateral bending, and vertically on the Z axis. The rolls run to the required positions via ninety-six servo shafts. Another fourteen servo shafts are located in the feeder, straightener and bracing.

Four IndraLogic L65 PLCs in the IndraControl V industrial PC handle the control functions. Rexroth collaborated with Ortic in developing a separate software program for the control system. This technology has convinced many customers. International demand for the system is already substantial and further areas of application continue to open up. That’s why Ortic will be cooperating with Rexroth on several future projects.